Eight principles of naming in branding

Even in the best of cases, the naming process remains subjective and emotional. Whether you name your child, boat or brand, the process can create countless discussions. Remember these principles while searching for the perfect name!

1.Be memorable

The internet search engine has changed everything. Instead of worrying about the place in the phone book, you need a meaningful and truly convincing name. The key to any name – simple or complex, abstract or descriptive – is attracting attention and the ability to be easily memorized.


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2. Full of significance

Choose a name that tells the story of the brand. Over time, you can expand the meaning of your name and add more layers to make it stronger – a visual identity, a color, a sound. The more meaning the name is, the more profitable it will be for you.

From a word that originally meant just a stamp on a passport, Visa surrounded his name with a number of associations – tourism, access, opportunities, identity, status – allowing them to tell the right story at the right time.

3. Say it out loud


The best names are those people are eager to tell their friends. The names that always stay on their lips invite buyers to become a viral marketing agency. Say, shout and even sing the names that you think will echo in the years to come.


Happy coincidence? In 1783, Johann Jacob Schweppe chose to name his acidified drink by his own name. After 200 years, consumers still love this name.

4. Do not expect to fall in love


Even the best names may not seem extraordinary when you hear them for the first time. When the name evolves into a brand, it will acquire more associations. Give the name you are considering a chance to grow, then try to imagine what could happen in five to ten years.

Initially a variant of Google, the numeric, was followed by 100 zeros. Google has come to represent a playful and innovative culture that offers everything from e-mail to operating systems.

5. Listen to your fears

Big names attract attention by breaking rules – but a name that defines your expectations may also seem scary. Leave fear in the back and you will find energy and possibilities. This one can tell you you’ve found a name that stands out.

ProMail, the early candidate for the name of what we know today as BlackBerry, would probably have been an easy sale for RIM. But once users have been in contact with the perfect device, it has become obvious what name it suits.

6. You stand out in the crowd

If you’re different, you want to say differently. Use your name to focus on what makes your brand special. Look at your category and see where it is going. What do customers expect? How can your name signal something new?

In a market dominated by names of people and places, Hilton, Marriott, Hyatt, Radisson, W had the courage to sound new, young, energetic and stylish. Today, it is the first destination for business people who want to balance style with substance.

7. Too much is never enough

The first 100 names you think are likely to be the same as the ones your competitors thought. Use naming specialists to develop thousands of alternatives. To reach a name that meets all the goals, you need a broad and profound list.

Thousands of names were created, hundreds were checked, and scores were counted. A name has emerged and now countless conversations are being created around this brand “Accent on the future”.

8. Expect the story to evolve

There are always reasons to dislike a name, but you will not be able to make the right decision if you make no decision. Remember that the names are only part of the brand and are elastic – you can turn them to express what you want.

Thus, the word “Virgin” reminds you of olive oil, Maria or “The Material Girl”. But as a brand name, Virgin has come to position itself as a provocative attitude that can sell anything from mobile phones to space holidays.

Source: landor.com